FTC KickOff at iSPACE in Cincinnati OH PDF Print E-mail
Sunday, 18 September 2011 22:16

 

 

We met at the Diamond’s at 6:45am and loaded up the RV for the drive to iSpace. All of the team except Phil were able to attend the event. Phil was running in his high school cross country meet. We arrived at iSpace a little before 9 a.m. and helped set up the “Get Over It” field.

At 9:30, together with Team 4530 Infinite Resistance, we did a demonstration scrimmage so that the rookie teams could get a feel for what a real match is like before they go to a tournament. When we attended our first scrimmage last year, we were really surprised how crowded the field was when there were four robots in play! When we practiced with just our one robot, our practice field in the garage had seemed spacious by comparison.

At 10:00 a.m., we did our panel presentation on “What Rookie Teams Need to Know”. We gave our key points, shared some of our experiences as a first year team, and then answered questions. We brought in our robot, engineering note book  and scouting notebook so that the participants could see how we approached the challenge last year. After our talk, our team split up so we could go hear some of the other talks. I think that we picked up some good pointers for this year.

At 11:00 a.m., we finally got to see what everyone was waiting for...the new game and field!! Just for fun, we tried to run our robot from “Get Over It” on the new field. Our robot could move the bowling ball and score it on the home area and we could also flip over the crates. All those racquetballs are really going to be a challenge and make driving difficult if they get under the robot and caught in the wheels (our first design challenge). 

During the rest of the afternoon, we helped teams with building and programming. By the end of the day, several of the rookie teams had robots that they could drive around. We ended the day by going with Elizabeth and Matthew Worsham for ice cream and a hike in one of the local parks. 

Thanks to Linda Neenan and everyone at iSpace for the great FTC Kick Off event. I think that we are all off to a great start for this season. 


Cougars,

 

Thanks so much for helping out at the FTC kick-off this weekend.  We heard from several of the rookie team members (and some of the more experienced teams as well) how helpful the information you shared with them was.  We heard one comment that went something like this.  “Just getting to see what the Cougar’s robot could do made this worthwhile.”  We really appreciate your willingness to spend a whole day giving tips to other teams. 

 

You’ve come a long way since your rookie season last year and we here at iSPACE wish you a very successful 2011-12 FTC season.

 

Linda

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 20 September 2011 21:16
 
Slide deck from our 2013 Advanced Programming Workshop PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Sunday, 18 September 2011 00:00
Here's the 2013 Slide Deck
Attachments:
Download this file (2013 Cougar Advanced NXT-G Programming Workshop v1 w EV3.pdf)2013 Cougar Advanced NXT-G Programming Workshop v1 w EV3.pdf[ ]3778 Kb04/10/13 09:48
Download this file (2013 Cougar Advanced NXT-G Programming Workshop v1 w EV3.pptx)2013 Cougar Advanced NXT-G Programming Workshop v1 w EV3.pptx[ ]5753 Kb04/10/13 08:56
Download this file (CougarAPWconvertedEV3.pdf)CougarAPWconvertedEV3.pdf[ ]3514 Kb04/10/13 09:48
Download this file (CougarAPWconvertedEV3.pptx)CougarAPWconvertedEV3.pptx[ ]4547 Kb04/10/13 09:47
Last Updated on Friday, 04 October 2013 09:49
 
Cougars at iSPACE "Bowled Over!" FTC KickOff PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Friday, 16 September 2011 22:19
Last Updated on Tuesday, 17 September 2013 05:10
 
2011 Cougar FTC Team #4251 PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Sunday, 04 September 2011 00:00

The 2011-2012 Cougar FTC Team #4251

  
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Last Updated on Monday, 30 January 2012 00:29
 
Joey Explains Magnetic Attachments PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Tuesday, 05 October 2010 18:37

Question

Quick question about the magnets.  I'm a 2nd year coach but this is the first I've heard of them.  I see how and what to order, but exactly how did your team use them?  Are they used to attach attachments to the robot instead of "clicking" Legos together?  Did you ever have problems with attachments falling off their magnets, or are they pretty strong?

Answer

Magnets:  Don't over-rate their usefulness.  They are 1 means to an end.  There are multiple ways to do what we are doing with magnets.  The logic-stream goes like this.

1 - Highly specialized tools are more effective at performing specific tasks with simple programming.
2 - Time is the most limiting resource in an FLL round.
3 - If we can make attachment switching both very fast and reliable then we can utilize highly specialized tools without running out of time.
4 - We used magnets.  We have seen other teams use a girder in hole kind of method, one team had a standard slot under the robot and pushed tools out and left them on the field, and one other team used a remove tools only kind of process.  The goal is the same.  To make the in base transitions quick, reliable, and easy for the kids to do.

This year we had 3 different tools that attached in the same way to the front of the robot, with magnets, and 1 more tool that snapped over the arm and attached with magnets.  This year our robot had a flat front made out of girders.  That flat front had 2 one pip spots in it where the girders left a hole.  The tools had flat backs (to mesh with the robots flat front) except where the robot had a hole, the tools had a girder sticking out 1 pip (we used an "L" girder to accomplish it), that would fit in the hole in the front of the robot.  So the tool, if held against the front of the robot, was generally stable and would not slide around if held against the front of the robot.  The magnets were then used to "hold" the tool against the front of the robot.  The magnets weren't needed to keep the tool from getting too close to the robot.  The magnets weren't needed to keep the tool from sliding around on the front of the robot.  The magnets were only needed to keep the tool from pulling away from the front of the robot.
 
And yes, the magnets are pretty strong. 

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Last Updated on Tuesday, 05 October 2010 21:04
 
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