Just One More Cougar Rover Run... PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jamie Diamond   
Wednesday, 25 August 2010 22:04
Dim lights Embed Embed this video on your site

 It's late.  The Live Mission Webcast is done.  We scored 220.

 At Dave Fort's suggestion Joey and I went down to the basement and made one more run.  We turned the rings to random orientations and sent the robot off to do it's thing one more time...  It proceeded to pick up all the rings but dropped one out of the basket for another 220, but this time with random ring orientations.  And here's the on-board video.

Last Updated on Thursday, 26 August 2010 17:55
 
Cougar RoverCam on the MoonBots Live Mission Webcast PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Wednesday, 25 August 2010 21:56

Dim lights Embed Embed this video on your site  The Robot's eye view during our Live Mission Webcast.  We scored 220. We only attempt 250 of the possible 350 points.  We have run 310 points but it takes us about 4 minutes.

 We took 2 photos of the Heritage Artifacts.  One at long range, as we paused on the landing pad for 1/2 a second after we started the mission.  This second one as we spun and paused, after leaving the Peak of Eternal Light. 
From Cougar LEGO Robotics Team - Photos of Heritage Artifacts
Last Updated on Wednesday, 25 August 2010 22:34
 
Cougar MoonBots Programs PDF Print E-mail
Written by The Cougars   
Wednesday, 25 August 2010 15:37

These are the programs that made our robot move.

Master Control 

xMission1-V11 - This is our master program.  It calls the mission sub-programs and manages the time

Mission MyBlocks 

xStartFront2 - Start based on the Front Ultrasonic sensor.  This program will pause, give a sound, and then wait for you to wave something very close to the front Proximity (ultrasonic) sensor.  It will give a beep to confirm that you actually triggered the front prox sensor. 

MP 1v10 p1 - Mission 1 version 10 using rear prox (ultrasonic sensor) on port 1.  Cross the field, pick up the 2 yellow rings by the back wall, park on the POEL.

MP 2bv12 p0 - Mission 2b version 12 using no rear prox sensor.  Leave the POEL, photograph the Heritage Artifacts, and pick up the blue ring in the right side crater.

MP 3bv12 p1 - Missoin 3b version 12 using rear prox sensor on port 1.  Leave the right side crater. Cross to the left side of the field.  Pick up the 2 yellow rings.

MP 4bv12 - Mission 4b version 12.  Dash for home after mission 3.

MP 5v11 p1 - Mission 5 version 11.  Pick up blue ring from left side crater and then dash for home, all after mission 3.

A Sample of our Standard Movement MyBlocks

xFwdDOC - Forward Duration On Course.  This MyBlock takes 3 inputs.  Duration (in degrees of rotation of the drive motors), Power, and Compass-Course.  It takes care of everything else.

xBwdDOC - Backwards Duration On Course.  This MyBlock also takes 3 inputs.  It's like xFwdDOC except it goes backwards instead of forwards.

xFwdPOC - Forward Proximity On Course.  This MyBlock takes 3 inputs.  Proximity (in centimeters, how far you want to get to what you are approaching), Power, and Compass-Course.  It will move the robot in the direction you want, at the motor power you want, until you are the distance you want from what you are approaching.

xBwdBP1OC - Backwards BackProximity On Course.  This MyBlock takes 3 inputs. Proximity (in centimeters, how far the back Prox sensor is from what you are backing up to), Power (how fast you will go), and Compass-Course (the direction the robot should try to stay facing, so you actually travel 180 degrees from this course since you are backing up, think about facing north but backing south)

xTurnToCourse - Turn to Compass Course.  This MyBlock takes 2 inputs.  Power and Course.  Power is how fast you will turn.  Course is the direction you will end up facing.  It will make the robot turn in the shortest direction to face the new direction. 

xRampArmDown - This program uses the loop counter (divided by 3) to determine the power of a motor block lowering the arm.  It also sets a maximum speed.  This is like our Ramp Move MyBlocks from the Smart Move Challenge.  It smoothly brings a motor up to a predetermined speed. (p.s. At the time of our Live Mission Webcast the arm didn't work quite right.  We worked on it over the weekend and got it fixed.  It turns out we forgot to put a motor stop block at the end of the this MyBlock.  Fixed now and works much better.) 

Attachments:
Download this file (xMission1-V11.rbtx)xMission1-V11.rbtx[A Complete ]4131 Kb30/08/10 07:28
Last Updated on Monday, 30 August 2010 07:33
 
Cougar MoonBot photos PDF Print E-mail
Written by Dr. M. Judith Radin   
Sunday, 22 August 2010 20:52

 

 

Here are some photos of our final Cougar Moonbot.

Last Updated on Sunday, 22 August 2010 22:23
 
Cougar blog - Joey PDF Print E-mail
Written by Joey   
Sunday, 22 August 2010 14:40
Its 3:40 PM on August 22. I just got home from Canada. I am seeing the field for the  first time.  Its a lot bigger than I realized. We finished the video in Canada and are working on uploading it now. It feels good to be home but it is weird. I cant wait to see the robot run in person. Ive seen videos but never live. The robot looks good. We will do some last touches tonight. There will be no more blogging after this until the actual session so until then...Joey out.
Last Updated on Sunday, 22 August 2010 15:17
 
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  • Super Regionals - Then and Now
    Super Regional competitions were piloted in 2014 with the intent of creating a more balanced progression of competition. As FIRST Tech Challenge grew, the single World Championship accommodating 128 teams resulted in a very small percentage of teams making it to the top level of competition.

    Super Regional events provided a solution to this problem, and allowed more teams to reach a higher level of competition. The events were a tremendous success. The regions that stepped up to organize, fundraise and execute the events were amazing. The sponsors who believed in the vision donated over a million dollars to make them happen. The team experience was unlike anything else. We are truly grateful for the passion and effort that went into these events.

    Since the inception of Super Regionals several things have changed. Most significantly, we’ve added a second World Championship, as well as new World Championship venues.



    In 2017 FIRST Tech Challenge doubled the number of teams attending World Championships from 128 to 256. The percentage of teams progressing from one competition level to the next was turned on its head. In addition to more spots for 40 international FIRST Tech Challenge teams we added a waitlist/lottery for 80 FIRST Tech Challenge teams at World Championships. That still left spots for 136 Super Regional teams, or 47% of teams competing at Super Regionals.

    The cost to teams competing in both Super Regionals and World Championships is not insignificant. In addition, the cost of the events themselves is substantial, the volunteer and coach time, and the compression of the FIRST Tech Challenge season, it really adds up. Most importantly, the original reason for creating Super Regionals which was helping more students reach a higher level of competition is being solved by the addition of a second World Championship event.

    Taking into account all these factors, 2018 will be the last year of FIRST Tech Challenge Super Regionals.

    Houston and Detroit World Championships each offer new opportunities, mainly in layout and the chance to have all programs again under one, enormous roof. In fact each of the new venues can accommodate more FIRST Tech Challenge teams than our previous venues.

    Starting in 2019 we are happy to announce that each World Championship will host 160 FIRST Tech Challenge teams, or a total of 320 teams from around the world. We will continue to make the FIRST Tech Challenge World Championship experience loud. Teams can expect to compete side-by-side on the largest stages with FIRST Robotics Competitions and in places like Minute Maid Park and Ford Field as well as the George R. Brown and Cobo Convention Centers.



    The growth of FIRST Tech Challenge continues, and we love it. Making our program available to more and more students is what it’s all about. We’re proud to have Championships that recognize and celebrate the students, coaches, volunteers and sponsors that make it all happen. I look forward to seeing you out at the competitions and then changing the world!

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    Ken Johnson, FIRST Tech Challenge Director